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20121208
20121208
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STATION
FBC 5
MSNBCW 4
KPIX (CBS) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
MSNBC
Dec 8, 2012 1:00am PST
earth to see the whole thing. like the crew of apollo 8, who took this picture commonly known as "earth rise" from the window of the craft as they orbited the moon in 1968. unfortunately, nearly half the earth was in shadow. an unmanned soviet spacecraft called zond 7 got this shot during a lunar fly-by. i guess you would call that a gibbous earth. fully lit by the sun. it is probably a shot you have seen so often you don't think how amazing it is. it was nicknamed the blue marble and it was taken by one of the astronauts on board, apollo 17. apollo 17 launched 40 years ago today, december 17, 1972. it was a night launch, aiming for the littoral valley. gene cernan, harrison jack schmitt and ron evans aboard. apollo 17 launched at night, and when they landed three days later, the sun was behind them. and so that particular launch trajectory put a fully formed beautifully lit earth in the window of the command module at a time when the astronauts really should have been too busy to look at it. here is how al reinert, who co-wrote the movie "apollo 13" describes what happened. quot
PBS
Dec 7, 2012 4:00pm PST
there, you had better be willing to fork out to 1.2 $5 billion. this is 40 years after apollo 17 went to the moon. our correspondent has all of the details. >> december, 1972. nasa sense and astronauts to the moon for the last time. no one has been back since. >> one giant leap for private enterprise. >> some former employees have launched a new company. it says it will soon be offering commercial flight back to the surface. >> our vision is to create a reliable and affordable u.s.- based, commercial lunar transportation system. >> this is the module they used 40 years ago and this is what they hope will take people there by 2020. the company says it will cost $1.4 billion. it will be open to corporations and wealthy individuals. countries like japan, south korea and south africa would be able to carry out research on the lunar surface. 40 years ago, only the resources of the u.s. could send an astronaut to them in. now there is no political will or the money to do it again. according one of the last man to be there, it will be the private sector from now one that will leave the
FOX News
Dec 8, 2012 7:30am PST
percent. >> apollo 13 commander thinking one out of 10 chances of surviving that. isn't that out of this world? >> and you know what else is stock picks from our shooting stars. none of them heroes, but they are all good friends. >> the space program, for america. liquiify national gas is huge . the company will do extraordinary well because of it cheniere. >> i agree with you about natural gas in general. but i rather have companies that are making money >> what is making money. >> i think boring is it better. >> hey, i built a crire on it. >> it is it a three percent dividend yield as walgreen is, it is a good idea. >> ben? >> super competive field. it is a
FOX News
Dec 8, 2012 1:00pm PST
is the commander of a apollo 17 and the last ever made on the moon's surface leaving a special legacy for america's space program. joining us live. captain eugene cernan and last man to walk on the moon. i can't tell you how excited i was to talk to you today. thank you for joining us. >> you are welcome heather. you might have guessed i had no requests for auditions. >> heather: did you plan ahead what you were going sing and what you were going to do? >> no, we didn't. we plan ahead all we're going to from a scientific, but everything else you heard from most of these missions, your reaction to the environment and reaction to things. even things that were said when we left the moon, they come to you because of what you are confronted with. >> heather: explain to us. take us all back there that moment when you first stepped foot on the to the moon surface. what did you see and what did it feel like? >> well, heather, my first step was mine. no matter what a lot of people want to believe, it can never be taken away from me. the fact of life there were other people who stepped,
FOX Business
Dec 8, 2012 6:00am EST
of the matter is 40 years ago today, apollo 17 took off, our last mission to the moon. the last time human beings were to set foot on the lune nare -- lunar surface. back then, we ownedded the space race. anything was possible. we were reaching for the stars. forty decembers later, we can't reach a stupid budget accord. what happened to us? from owning space to hitching rides with the russians just to get into space. it's all part of the special we're planning on fox news, 9 # p.m. sunday. it's a chance for you to find out the real meaning of fly me to the moon, a time when we did set a goal and meet it and never said "couldn't" or "can't," and these exclusive intervis with the heros that got us there speak about a time and a place when america ruled the world. take a peek. >> the commander of flight has the power to abort it; right? >> when you launch, the commander, dave scott in our case -- >> liftoff. >> something goes wrong, and it veers here and there, we had several modes of abort tose. just twist a handle and we'd abort. we held his hand. say, no, dave, no. you're n going to
CBS
Dec 8, 2012 5:00am PST
time a human being stood on the moon. it was the apollo 17 mission and retired astronaut has held a long time secret. he left his camera behind on the moon and wishes he can use it one time. >> he's now 78 years old he told bloomberg news he thought some other astronaut would have visited the site by now, retrieve the black camera and returned it to the earth for study. well he now wishes he had taken a picture of his own boot print 40 years later still the last left by a man on the moon. a little sad. >>> welcome back to cbs "this morning saturday." i'm jar junior. >> i'm anthony mason. our top story this half hour a trial here in new york is breaking a great deal attention to a deeply insue lar religious sect. a fundamentalist group of hasidic jews. cbs "this morning" senior correspondent john miller has been following the trial. he's here with a revealing look at the satmar sect. >> fascinating case pap case that's being watched closely anthony not because of the allegations that a trusted community leader sexually abused a young girl he was assigned to help but also because the
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)